2022 Keynote Address


Aging Intervention and Health Transformation

Aesthetic medicine and specialized cosmetic treatments improve the extrinsic signs of aging, but besides the desire to look great as they live longer, today’s sophisticated aesthetic patients have now turned their attention to improving their health to feel as good as they look. Along with the physical aspects of aging, the diseases of aging are also on the minds of mature consumers.

More than 20% of the world population will be over the age of 65 by 2050, incrementally increasing the risk factor for chronic diseases – ranging from Alzheimer’s to cardiovascular conditions to cancer.  Is it unalterable? Recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the aging process suggest that there may be ways to intervene and extend lifespan and, more importantly, healthspan.

Age management medicine is rapidly advancing on many levels so don’t miss your chance to hear Nathan LeBrasseur, PT, PhD, expand on these topics and share how he and his team at Mayo Clinic are exploring ways to combat aging and its consequences to transform human health.  

Presenter

Nathan LeBrasseur, PT, PhD

Dr. LeBrasseur is a professor and the co-chair of research in the department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Mayo Clinic. Dr. LeBrasseur directs the Healthy Aging and Independent Living Program in the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging, serves as the Scientific Director of the Office of Translation to Practice, and is the Co-Director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for Biology of Aging Research at Mayo Clinic. His team conducts translational “bench-to-bedside” research on strategies to improve physical function, metabolism, and resilience in the face of aging and disease. His latest work has centered on cellular senescence, a biological mechanism that underlies aging, and interventions to counter this process to optimize late-life health and function. Dr. LeBrasseur has published over 120 research papers that have been cited 20,000 times. He has received the Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging, the Nathan W. Shock Award from the National Institute on Aging, and the Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research from the American Federation for Aging Research. He is also a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America.